Drowned City Press Launches Second Childhood

Drowned City Press has reprinted Donna McMahon’s novel Dance of Knives and is launching her long awaited sequel, Second ChildhoodDance of Knives is a post apocalyptic adventure story set in 22nd century Vancouver. The NY Times called it “a technologically aware and emotionally wrenching twist on the old tale of Beauty and the Beast.”

In McMahon’s sequel, the action moves north to Cortes Island, a natural jewel in the inland sea. Author Eileen Kernaghan says:  “This is a writer who knows her science; but clearly, too, she has a close and loving relationship with the west coast landscape. At its heart, Second Childhood is a story of redemption, and the healing power of the natural world.”

There will be a Second Childhood book launch in Vancouver on Saturday, May 15 from 3-5 pm at the Lifestyles Cafe in City Square (12th and Cambie). (Please note that this has been rescheduled.)

More information about the books is available at www.drownedcitypress.ca.

danceofknives  secondchildhood

Michèle Laframboise book finalist at the GG!

LesventsdeTammerlanLes vents de Tammerlan, the second tome of Michèle Laframboise’s Chaaas’ cycle, is now a finalist of the General Governor’s literary Awards in the children’s literature category.

“This captivating novel by Michèle Laframboise strays from the well-worn paths of science fiction. While conserving the essential elements of the genre, the author’s subtle, at times poetic, prose creates moving and colourful images and gives life to complex, lovable characters. “

Says Michèle, “It is a small victory for my story and my paper children, and a larger victory for science-fiction, now recognized as a full flavour of the literary ice cream!”

Here’s an article by the Mississauga News.

Leslie Carmichael’s second children’s book published

amon-raLeslie Carmichael’s second children’s book, The Amulet of Amon-Ra, has been published as of December 2009, by CBAY Books. The book is for 9 and up, and is a time travel novel set in ancient Egypt, during the reign of the femal Pharaoh, Hatshepsut.

“Jennifer has always enjoyed learning about Ancient Egypt, but she never expected to visit there. Just seeing the Egyptian artifacts in her local museum is exciting enough. Then, an old friend of her grandmother gives Jennifer a beautiful, old scarab amulet. And things start to get really weird. After breathing some strange dust from inside her amulet, Jennifer wakes up in Ancient Egypt in a body with a strange but familiar face. Now known as Dje-Nefer, Jennifer explores her new world and tries to blend into her new life. But things in Egypt are not as they seem. Plots and mysteries abound, and Jennifer needs to unravel them if she ever wants to get back home.”

From Another Universe Column – On Religion

Author Lynda Williams is contributing a monthly column to Tyler Clarke’s Cutbanks: The Prince George Cultural Magazine. Tyler has granted Lynda the right to re-publish the columns a few months after each appears. The column, called From Another Universe, connects themes in real life with the Okal Rel Saga and its companion legacies series of stories and novellas set in the same ficitional universe. Below is the first online installment, from the July edition of Cutbanks in print. Cutbanks is a free magazine supported by advertizing revenue and distributed at cultural outlets in Prince George and area.


On Religion

by Lynda Williams, author of the Okal Rel Saga and editor of the Okal Rel Legacies collection

The quintessential Buffy the Vampire Slayer line for me is: “Note to self, religion freaky.” I concluded as much as a teenager trying to make sense of the diverse religious convictions in my father’s family while growing up in Prince George. I read a book named How the Great Religions Began by Joseph Gaer and decided there was definitely something universal underpinning the myriad manifestations of belief in the divine, although it might as easily have been a human need as an actual divinity of any sort. Now, having reached middle-age, I am back to square one on the question of belief in a Greater Good. I think we need it because science has pretty much flopped as a means of achieving peace on Earth through the techno-missionaries of corporate power. But I share Bill Maher’s fears, in his documentary film Religulous, about the threat posed by religious leaders to whom the destruction of life on earth is an acceptable risk in the single-minded pursuit of their own particular dogma. Sadly, I am just as sceptical about the ability of the scientific world view to side-step the pitfall of usurpation by greedy bastards. I doubt, for example, that too many of the CEOs gleefully impoverishing pensioners in pursuit of yet another yacht were attending any kind of church except a bank. In my own work as a novelist, I’ve found answers in the integrity of individuals, whatever their believe system, and a zero tolerance attitude to the idea of anyone blowing up the world to make a point. Part 2: Righteous Anger, in the Okal Rel Saga, deals most directly with religious strife, but moral dilemmas underpin the tensions in most books. Morality itself has become my bottom line. I just haven’t figured out how to define it any better than the dramatic portrayal of decisions made by characters in the thought experiment of my science fiction saga. If forced to try, I think it would go something like this: If nine out of ten grandmothers from a reasonable cross-section of cultures say it’s evil, then it’s evil. Cut it out.